Letter To The New, Young Military Spouse

On life, love, work, and your new role.  

To the new and young military spouse;

First and foremost, welcome to the family! Glad you’re here! 

I became a military spouse at 20. For me, it was quite interesting because my husband was away for the first two years of not just our marriage, but his contract. I lived in an area that wasn’t really close to a military station, so I never interacted with anyone military related. Until I went to go get my military ID. 

Once we were moved to our first station, we dove head first into a military community. The transition was quite fast and overwhelming. I felt like I was the only 21/22 year old military spouse who didn’t know anything or anyone. And it was intimidating. Not sure where to begin or who to talk to, I felt quite lonely. It was a combination of being so far away from the home I knew and loved, and being somewhere so different. 

But here’s what I have to share with you today.


A few words of advice on adjusting to the new role:

-The friends your spouse makes, will help you. They might be of the same age group, and they will have girlfriends or wives you can talk to. 

-Working in a military community introduces you other spouses. Working in the area, you’ll find another opportunity to meet friends. Many spouses work, and who knows? You might meet a new wine buddy! 

Another thing is that you may also feel weird about the spouses who have many years of experience under their belt. Don’t. They are the best resources for tips, advice, and hacks of military spouse life. Ask them all the questions you can. We’re all more than happy to help! They have the ultimate knowledge on deployments, families, moving, and the paperwork you have to do sometimes, which I am so grateful I asked about.

Additionally, please read up on everything you have to do as a new military spouse. You will have lots of changes and paperwork to do. I suggest you start with the name change if you plan on doing that. Don’t forget to enroll in DEERS, get your military ID, change over your medical provider (whenever you move to a new location). Keep copies of all documents, and keep multiple copies of your marriage certificate. 

Emotions:

You might do really well in your transition as a military spouse. But if you feel overwhelmed, stressed, sad, or homesick, that’s completely normal. It happens to a lot of us, and here we are on the other side to tell you it gets way better. 

Don’t be afraid of the deployments and time you might spend away. Those are the time you can pursue individual hobbies, side hustles, or even work two jobs to save some extra money. The opportunities are endless. 

There’s plenty of options for work. Just be patient and persistent. 

Being a military spouse is a roller coaster. But it can be so much fun, and so wonderful to be a part of your significant other’s journey. 

Every spouses’ journey is different; don’t compare it to anyone else’s. 

And finally…..make the most out of it! 

Sincerely,

Rose

P.S: If you ever need anyone to connect with, you can always email me!